Our Team


Dr. Christina Semeniuk

Dr. Christina Semeniuk

Associate Professor
2013 to present
semeniuk@uwindsor.ca

The unifying thread driving my research program is a focus on how human disturbance affects adaptive decisions of organisms as they attempt to optimize competing fitness-maximizing goals, and how these resulting tradeoffs ultimately modify the persistence and resilience of wildlife populations. My experience with conservation issues is based on a strong theoretical background in behavioural ecology that is combined with field studies, state-of-the-art quantitative methods such as agent-based modeling and system dynamics modeling, quantitative statistics, econometric models of human behaviour, and GIS applications. I joined the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research at the University of Windsor in January 2013.


Kathleen Church

Kathleen Church

Post-Doctoral Fellow
2018 to present

Kathleen recently completed her PhD in Jim Grant’s lab at Concordia looking at behaviour and personality in Atlantic salmon and cichlids. Kathleen is currently assessing the personality of Atlantic salmon over multiple tests with different stimuli, and aims to ultimately link personality traits to metabolic rates and anti-predator behaviours in a naturalized mesocosm.


Rodrigo Solis

Rodrigo Solis

PhD Candidate
2014-Present

Rodrigo is co-supervised by Dr. Sean Cox, and is based at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia. Rodrigo’s work examines migration patterns of the Monarch butterfly throughout North America using social-ecological modelling.


Chelsea Frank

Chelsea Frank

MSc Student
2019 to present

Chelsea has been a member of the Semeniuk Lab since she joined as a volunteer in the fall of 2016 when she was in second year. After completing her undergraduate thesis with the lab, Chelsea is continuing behaviour work at the Master’s level in the Semeniuk Lab. Chelsea will be working with hatchery salmon that have undergone triploidy or left as diploids, and raised with or without probiotics. Using a behavioural challenge, Chelsea will link favourable hatchery behaviours and brain gene expression to give new insights into Chinook salmon farming.


Patrick Jagielski

Patrick Jagielski

MSc Student
2017 to present

Patrick has spent two summer field seasons on East Bay Island, Nunavut. Patrick used a trail camera network and drone footage to establish how polar bears are moving across the island and if their foraging results in a net metabolic gain or loss. This research will give insight into polar bear foraging ecology on land. He is co-supervised by Cody Dey and supported by a MITACS grant.

 


Erica Geldart

Erica Geldart

MSc Student
2018 to present

Erica moved to Windsor from New Brunswick, where she recently completed her undergraduate degree at Mount Allison University. Her Honour’s thesis at Mount Allison investigated the movement patterns of Semipalmated Sandpipers and Semipalmated Plovers within Eastern New Brunswick. Under the co-supervision of Dr. Christina Semeniuk and  Dr. Oliver Love, Erica’s Master’s research will aim to link behaviour, ecophysiology, and evolutionary ecology in the common Eider, and to study the effects changing environment has on their fitness.


Brendyn St. Louis

Brendyn St. Louis

MSc Student
2019-Present

Brendyn will be working with YIAL hatchery salmon in British Columbia that have undergone triploidy or left as diploids, and raised with or without probiotics. Using a behavioural challenge, Brendyn will link favourable hatchery behaviours and physiological profiles to give new insights into Chinook salmon farming.


Alex Wilder

Alex Wilder

MSc Student
2019 to present

Alex is our first MSc. to be working with Brook Trout! She will be examining survival and behaviour performance in fish reared under different temperature regimes. Her fish will be tested at multiple stages in a new set of mazes to mimic trade-offs in a simulated environment.


Omar Taboun

Omar Taboun

MSc Student
2019 to present

Omar is working with our collaborator Eddie Halfyard from the Nova Scotia Salmon Association. The West River Atlantic Salmon population has experienced liming dosage to mitigate the effects of acidification. Omar is assessing the behavioural responses of Atlantic Salmon smolts migrating downstream to a novel predator and food. This behavioural data will be paired with acoustic tracking data as the salmon migrate through the river mouth and into the ocean.


Lida Nguyen-Dang

Lida Nguyen-Dang

Research Associate
2014 to present

Lida measured behavioural and gene expression differences between established and invasion front populations of the Round goby in the Great Lakes. She completed her genetic work with guidance from her co-supervisor, Dr. Daniel Heath. She is currently in the process of revising and re-submitting her manuscripts, as well as training and assisting Love Lab member Colin Finerty with his genetic expression work in Lake Ontario Chinook salmon. Lida’s work was supported by a CAISN project grant.


Theresa Warriner

Theresa Warriner

Research Associate
2016 to present

Theresa comes from a background of undergraduate research with contaminants and the Round Goby in Sigal Balshine’s lab at McMaster University. To try out something a little different, Theresa will be focusing on the behaviour and physiology of maternal effects on salmon offspring under Human-induced Rapid Environmental Change (HIREC) conditions. Theresa is co-supervised by Dr. Oliver Love.


Chelsea Crundwell

Chelsea Crundwell

Volunteer
December 2017 to present

Chelsea is an Environmental Science student and is currently working on the Atlantic salmon predator training experiments, quantifying morphology in imageJ and organizing the large data set.